Making an Impression

The idea that an artist must suffer to produce great art isn’t exactly true, but there is a strong basis for the idea. Some of the most stunning pieces are very sorrowful pieces, depicting great loss or pain. There is good a reason that these pieces are so popular. A good piece has to show or inspire great emotion. The viewer wants to be able to feel what they see; to have the perception of a connection with the artist. An artist’s goal is to achieve this, to make in impression; and to this end, an artist that suffers has an advantage. You can better portray an emotion if you have experienced it yourself and it is unfortunately far easier to suffer than to experience real bliss.

The works of every artist, and I use the term loosely when talking about me, will be influenced by their experiences. Being in the fire/rescue industry, my works have an obvious trend to them. In fact, it was my experiences that inspired to start my photography (gee go figure right?). Several of my friends would glorify what I do, and would tell me how much they’d love to do it. And again and again I’d find myself telling them that it’s not something I’d recommend they do. It takes a certain attitude to do this job but there are some that have an attitude that scares me. They want to be in it to be heroes. It’s the wrong attitude, and it’s one that makes it very easy to get someone killed. It’s a good feeling that people want to glorify certain professions as heroic. It gives people hope but when it comes to someone thinking they’re a hero it leads to injury.

As I see it, heroes don’t exist. There are people that are well trained and let their experience work, and there are good people that get lucky from time to time, but neither are the “hero’s” that some see them as. A hero is a concept that people came up with to make themselves feel secure; something to reassure them that there will be someone to save them, and the world isn’t than nice and clean cut. Like Oscar Wild said “Finally you see things as they really are, and that is the most horrible thing in the world.” But I digress. This wandering post is about the pictures that inspire that emotion, not what I think about said emotion; and besides, breaking that illusion would only further to break the illusions my pictures might hold.

To get back on track; when I started taking pictures of the scenes I visited, it was to try and show the hard work and less glamorous aspects of it. Through the years though, I started noticing that several pictures were bring back memories and re-inspiring emotions in me. I figured that maybe it’d be a fun concept to start displaying these photographs as art.

If you’ve followed me this far, it’s only fair that I show a couple of the pictures that inspired this post. This first picture speaks to one of my greater fears, the loss of family. I don’t know why but when I see it I see a little brother standing by helplessly as his older brother succumbs to the flames. It’s always been a tough one to look at for me but one of my favorites none the less.

I’m not the morbid type and don’t show any scenes that I feel are excessively gruesome, but these next two pictures are mature. This next one in particularly speaks to me. It has a lot to do with the individual that was in the accident but I hope it comes across as an impact statement to others. Given a back ground story or putting into context helps it make that statement, and I’d like to do a series that would achieve this effect. To look at it as seems rather lacking but to tell the whole story would take too long here… perhaps another day.

This last picture is once again a strong impact image, though it stands alone better than the last. It may be better suited for a drunk driving commercial than in a gallery but either way there is no need for a back story here.

Once again I am sorry for the late posting and hopefully I’ll be getting back on track here soon. Life has been busy but it won’t always be so. Until then, find some art that inspires you and try and have a good week.

A Devil In Every Flame

Wow… I guess if I’m going to be posting every other Friday I might want to find the pause button on life. Life being so busy can make things like this difficult but then again it gives me plenty to write about. Though seeing as I’m already late and I have too much to do tomorrow, I’m going to keep this one short and sweet.

It’s said that there is a devil in every flame, and through the years I have seen many a flame and through my photographs I have seen many an apparition. It’s funny what the camera will catch. In all the years I’ve been in this business I’ve probably only seen a “devil in the flame” maybe three times. Chalk it up to being busy or your mind playing tricks on you afterwards; but the only time I seem to see these things is in the pictures later. It’s a cop-out on typing on my behalf, but I’m going to share a few of those with you.

This one doesn’t have the obvious devil in it but it is one of the few situations that I saw one. This pic was taken just after me seeing it. The wire that is hanging down to the right looked just like a noose and still does kind of. It was hanging just below the ceiling and looked like there was someone in it. It was all just illusion but I could have sworn there was someone in it. Then it dropped to the floor like it was loaded. It was all an illusion but an interesting experience none the less.

This one is the namesake and inspiration to this post. One of my favorite and most unexpected pictures, I was astonished when I saw the skull in the upper right corner. Staring at this one for long enough, I’ve found a few more but it’s probably just my over active imagination.

This picture was taken way back in ’02 on a cheep camera through a dirty window and at night; so it’s not the best quality. But even so, I’ve always enjoyed the pic. I’m one of the guys right below the tree. I love how it looks like the fire is getting ready to reach out and grab us.

This was an old trailer house that went up, from the same house as the first pic. A strong wind hit the other end of the trailer and caused this nice barrel roll of flame out the end. I thought it was interesting how it looked like a face screaming out of the end of the house.

I have several more to show but I feel this post has gone on long enough and I’ve probably lost my few readers due to boredom by now so I’ll just quit while I’m behind and make an extra effort to make my next post on time.

 

Strike a Pose: The importance of image

When on the job, our image that we portray to ourselves and to the public is crucial. The public relies on us to provide stabilization to their lives when they’re at their worst, and support to the community when we aren’t on calls. When it comes down to it we as firefighters agree to put ourselves on display when we agree to be on the department.

There are many ways that this is done. First and most obvious is through our physical appearance. When we take pride in our equipment and our gear the public sees it and they take comfort in it. When our equipment looks broken down and our gear looks tattered it’s difficult to have confidence in a department’s ability to perform. It’s seen when we are doing charitable events, by spectators when we are on scene and by the victims on scene. It can affect our funding and more importantly it’s embarrassing. It’s hard to hold your head up high and look the public in the eye when they don’t think you can do the job you promised.

On the bright side, this is one of the easiest things to remedy. When I first got on my department, we didn’t have state of the art equipment, heck we didn’t even have new equipment. The apparatus that we had were used, and the gear was “hand downs”. Even so we kept a good appearance. We cleaned and polished our trucks, washed the hoses down, and made sure everything was inventoried after every call. Even though our stuff was old we looked good.

This carried over into our confidence, which in turn brings me to the most important way that we put ourselves on display. The way we react isn’t only important to the public but to ourselves. When on a scene the attitude is infectious. If a firefighter is unsure or panicky not only will it adversely affect the patients but it can have drastic effects on your fellow firefighters. This holds true for all firefighters but especially for the seasoned firefighters and officers. When you have a strong adverse reaction those that look up to you can question their ability to perform; and the people that rely on you to watch their back can start to question whether you’ll be there or not. On the other hand, being able to show confidence in what you’re doing and not over react to situations will instill confidence in your crew and everyone around you.

Sadly this isn’t the easiest thing to deal with. There are a litany of things that can cause us to react adversely from how the people around you react to tragic things you might see. Your best ally will be experience, but even then you’ll have to be careful. I remember a call many years back. There was a bad pile up on the interstate. It was a particularly bad winter storm and we had to put civilians in our command unit to get them out of the cold and off of the interstate as vehicles were continuing to add to the crash. The interstates were closed down, and I don’t know how they were getting past the HP but that’s aside from the point. I had just got the last individual into our command, an old suburban, when a car appeared out of the snow sliding sideways towards us. I jumped in and holding on to the spare told them to gun it. The car ended up bumping the car we were just helping and coming to a stop short of us. One of the newer guys on the department was reasonably scared and asked if we should go back and see if they needed help. I was embarrassed when the first thing for the civilians to hear was one of the other guys saying to hell with that.

It’s an incident that still bothers me today. I keep looking back on it and wondering if there was a way we could have prevented it. When it comes down to it there wasn’t really. It didn’t stop us from doing our job, we were tired, and the individual said the first thing that came to mind. It was a simple over reaction to the circumstance. But the look in the civilian’s eyes that was next to me was really hard for me to deal with. It’s a prime example of what not to do and we put on classes on how to act in front of the public because of it. But when it comes down to it, I find that it’s far more effective to instill confidence in my crew by showing confidence to them. It’s not easy some times and it’s an individual battle for each person, but one that needs to be undertaken.

Enjoy what you do and you’ll never work a day in your life

It’s a saying that I holds true during most of my job but there are certain days and some times weeks that go above and beyond. The Hensel fire was going on back in June of ’02 and it was one of the worst and best fires I’ve been on. It started out as a rather rushed fire. We were in Casper getting supplies and weren’t even supposed to be available for assignment. There was a last minute change and we were tossed in with a strike force. We quickly bought needed supplies including a pair of boots for me. I will never again get a set of Georgias. By the end of the fire the top of my feet were worn through and bleeding and the soles were just one giant blister.

We ended up on the Hensel Fire where every morning started out with a long drive from camp to the area of the fire we were working on. A local rancher had been causing problems and we ended up getting diverted to a new area. We came to this beautiful meadow and set it up as our staging area for the day before we continued up to our part of the fire. Before we could continue though, the rancher decided that he didn’t want us continuing. The reason for this was told to me but I can’t say whether it was speculation or not so I’ll leave it out of this. What it comes down to is that the head of the fire was making a run for it as well so our div. sup. decided it was best for us to stage there until the run was done. It turned out to set the stage for a hell of a day.

We spent the morning watching helicopters dip from one of the ponds and eventually made our way up the hill side to get some better angles on the meadow so we could get some better photo ops. In actuality it was an excuse to just do something. That didn’t last long before we got bored and headed back down to the staging point. And shortly after, competition ensued… Friendly competition of course. Basic things like wood cutting contest, races, arm wrestling, anything we could come up with. It wasn’t long before bets were going around and everyone was having a good time. As you can imagine, when you’re used to doing a job that’s physically demanding, you tend to get restless when you have nothing to do. More importantly, people get creative. Getting more and more involved in competition most people got so involved that slipping away to get some mischief done became possible.

The mischief started out as a simple joke. Our crew was patched together from several crews which is normal. In this case, we had some real… unique individuals with us. One of the crews that got teamed up with us was a bunch of rooks. They had never really seen fire before, at least nothing big, and they were gullible as hell. So while a couple of us slipped away, a couple of us started telling stories of previous fires. They listened with awe believing everything we said, which at this point had actually been true. But of course being the pranksters that we are, we decided to take advantage of that.

Earlier that day, we had seen a duck that had succumbed to smoke inhalation and managed to get it tucked nicely away on a cow pie. After some effort, we managed to float it out into the pond that the helicopter was dipping from. You might be surprised to know how hard it is to slip away from a group, and set up a prank like this without getting caught. I still don’t know how we did it. Either way, somehow we managed to convince them that ducks only sleep while floating on cow pies. It even went as far as to convince them that they only sleep in the middle of ponds as a safety feature. They took thousands of pictures and spent hours trying to wake it. We told them that as long as the head is under its wing, it would never wake up. They finally gave up and we gave the poor thing a proper burial.

Ominous Glow: When Panic Meets Rational Thought

Have you ever had one of those moments when you thought, “great… This is it.”? I would love to say that that would be an understatement here but unfortunately it’s exactly what I was thinking. I wasn’t capable of anything more at the time. Let me set the situation up for you so you might be able to understand a little better. We got paged out to a methane compressor station fire. When we arrived on scene we found that it was one of the twenty seven compressor buildings on this particular facility. Each building contained four engines and each engine running over a cool mill. This particular facility ran 24/7 and was a major supply line so the company man on scene was eager to get the place back up and running. We had the gas to the facility shut down and began suppression operations. The crew was constantly getting in the way and putting themselves in danger in the process. We eventually had to have the police remove the crew to prevent them from being a further hindrance.

As you can imagine tension was already high on this call but suppression efforts started going our way. We contained the fire to the half of the building where the initial ignition occurred losing only two of the engines. As the initial battle started to die down, try to imagine if you can an eerie silence. The fire was out and there was a lot of heat still in the building but there was still a lot of smoke so it was black in there. I shut the nozzle down and all I can hear is my SCBA hissing from each breath and there’s nothing I can see. For now I’m just listening, trying to hear any noise. After the way this call started, this silence is unnerving to say the least. I was just starting to tell my partner that we should pull out and get the building ventilated when I hear the deafening roar. As I turn toward the sound I seen this flash of light and instead of reacting, I just pause. My mind went blank and I just sat there for a second thinking “well…. That was a good life I guess.”

It must not have been that long that I paused because my team told me I tore out of there faster than they had ever seen me move and with murder in my eyes. It didn’t take me any time to figure out what had happened and when I came out of that building I was ready to do things that are unbefitting of a firefighter, or most people for that matter. Luckily for the company man, our Chief was the one that got to him before any of us.

In this instance, the officers on scene just didn’t have the manpower to fully secure the scene. The company man had wanted to get the facility back up and running so he grabbed a couple hands and turned it on; but when he had the gas turned back on, he failed to turn the bypass on to that building. Needless to say, the entire facility was shut down immediately and everyone that wasn’t fire or police was removed from the facility. Up until this instance, scene security hadn’t been a problem. We worked with the methane companies well and they always co-operated with us without question. So to this point there was no need for certain regulations to be made.

It was a bad situation that led to some serious meetings and thought being put into our policies. More importantly, it also gave me another perspective on situations. It’s really hard to listen to a teacher telling you to be aware of the people surrounding a scene and implement it. You hear and understand the reasons but until you are put in a situation like this one, it doesn’t really sink in. There’s so much going on that it’s easy to miss things. But then something like this happens and you start taking that extra time on the way to the call to think “what if”, and the time after the calls to actually analyze what went good and what could have gone better. It’s a personal experience that most of us will have to experience firsthand to get the benefit from but it’s a good example of where panic can meet rational thought.

Nostalgia: Learning To Enjoy The Good Things In Life

In the back of a desk drawer there’s an old poster, it’s been there for ages gone by. I was once told it comes from a time when fires raged and people sacrificed themselves for the lives of others. I finally decided it deserved to be framed and while there, the shop owner informed me that the bulky subject of the photo was called an “engine” though it looks like no engine I’ve ever seen. The primitive clothes in the background, used for protecting the individuals that sacrificed themselves.  Oh what a life it would have been to live back in those days. The days of gallant actions and adventure around every corner.

Okay, so maybe it wasn’t quite that way but looking into the past has that effect on people sometimes. And I’m no exception; there’s always been an old poster on our department wall and it always gave me this feeling. I’ve always wondered in 100, 200, maybe 300 years, what are they going to think of the life and times we lived. Even looking back on the recent history of my department I find myself wanting to idealize it. It’s kind of funny how fast one develops a sense of nostalgia. Not long after I got onto the department, I was sitting around the fire hall, listening to the stories of some of the more seasoned members; I was in awe of their stories. They had such great memories and a joy to their eyes as they retold them. I was dying to experience those memories, to make some of my own. It was something that I knew I would have to wait many years for… It’s good to know from time to time that what you know can be wrong.

I’ve been working in fire for eleven years now and I had to pause a moment and chuckle when I found myself telling stories to the new rookies. I didn’t, and still to a point don’t, think they quite understood how good they have it. They tend to take some of the equipment for granted. It’s easy to do when that’s all you’ve experienced and it’s probably how my mentors looked at me. Who knows, they may still, though I hope it’s to a great degree less than they used to. I’ve seen a lot of changes and advances in our department and I try to take every little thing to heart.

When I first got on, our department was considerably smaller. We had way too much area to cover and far too little personnel and equipment to do the job effectively. We covered all of Johnson County except inside the town of Buffalo, giving us a total of about forty five hundred square miles. Our gear was old, outdated, and handed down from person to person. Our equipment was running but in constant need of repair. Even the hall was rented from the county. Our meetings were tailgate meetings and after a long fire, we all sat back cracked a beer and enjoyed a job well done. Those were the good times.

Don’t get me wrong, times aren’t so bad now. It’s just that I’ve seen a lot of changes go by quickly. There were new additions, new equipment and now a new hall. I find myself saying things like “I remember when” and “when I first got on” and the people I’m telling it too are newer than me while a few of them are older than me. It’s a feeling that I liked and I wanted to share with whoever might be going through the old department photos sometime in the future. I wanted to immortalize the last few moments of the old fire hall, so I took this picture just before we moved halls. It’s my dedication to the old hall when our bunks were by the engines and we weren’t above sharing gear. It was a time when the tailgate meeting was normal. In short, it’s a dedication to the good ol’ times.

Devastation: A moment when time stands still

I really like the contrast in this one. It makes it feel like you're there and just for a second time has stopped. The fire has gone through and nuked the ground, wiping clean the once dense vegetation in a matter of moments. When this fire went through it took less than a minute to reduce heavy sage to the bare ground that was left.

 

Aptly named for obvious reasons; this picture is actually named from the sense of irony that it inspires in me. It brings up feelings probably completely opposite to what an independent viewer would feel. For me, it inspires feelings of joy and reminiscing. I have to admit, this is probably my favorite photograph to date, and not just of my own work but of any I’ve seen. It’s not that I feel I’m the best out there (not really good even) or that I have the best equipment, it’s more of a personal thing. That kind of sounds arrogant but let me explain.

This fire was making a hard run at this time, to the point that we could only watch as it turned acres upon acres of trees and brush to simple ash in mere moments. We were tired, we were thirsty, and we were just hoping that our plans would come through. The smoke was a choking cloud that made you wonder what air tasted like and the heat was blistering. This was an inferno but amidst this turmoil I found a moment of perfection. Time slowed to a stop and held its breath while I took a picture of its beauty. It felt like a scene from a movie. It was one of those few moments when you feel like you have all the time in the world to look at your surroundings; to just walk around and experience a single moment in time.

It’s a rare thing for me to capture a moment so fully on camera as it was for me being there but to me that’s what this picture represents. Each time I look at this picture I relive the feelings of being on that fire. I remember the hard work and yes I’ll admit it, the good times that I had while fighting the fire. I’d be lying to say that I don’t enjoy a good fire, and fool if I thought I could make any of you think otherwise. And that’s where it’s personal. No one may ever look at this picture and see anything more than a fire gone by but for me, I see the fire exactly how I remember it. I see beauty, accomplishment, and everything that isn’t devastation.

My own insight on this picture shapes everything it is to me. It’s what gives it the beauty I see. Though I can’t help but wonder… When you first saw this picture did it merit a second glance? Was there a beauty in it for you as there was for me, or did you come to read this article out of mere curiosity? And if you have gotten this far; do your initial feelings of the picture still exist, or have they changed? And if you’re really feeling ambitious, tell me what you see in the picture. Regardless if you like it or not, feel free to voice it. I love hearing the opinions of others.